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 * THE COMPASSES * - MONTHLY NEWSLETTER - OF - SAN PEDRO LODGE 292

 

    http://www.sanpedrolodge292.com/freemasons   is a domain of San Pedro- Lodge No.292, Philippines 

IN THIS PAGE WE ANSWER FREQUENTLY ASKED GENERAL QUESTIONS ABOUT FREEMASONRY AND MASONS AND THE FOLLOWING SPECIFIC QUESTIONS ABOUT MEMBERSHIP:
1) WHO CAN BECOME A MASON (FREEMASON)? 
2) HOW WILL I KNOW IF I AM QUALIFIED TO BECOME A MASON ?
3) WHERE  OR TO WHOM SHALL I APPLY IN ORDER TO BECOME A MASON ?
4) WHY NOBODY HAS EVER ASKED ME TO BECOME A MASON ? 
5) SHALL I WAIT TO BE INVITED OR SHALL I BE THE ONE TO APPLY ? 
6) ANSWERS TO FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ON MASONS
7) MORE ANSWERS TO FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ON MASONS 
8) MASONIC COMPACT 
9) LINKS TO RELATED WEBSITES 
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STATED MEETINGS : FIRST SATURDAY OF EACH MONTH at 1.PM















Wednesday, December 30, 2009

ANNOUNCEMENT

SAN PEDRO LODGE 292 BLOG WITH LODGE's  RECORD OF EVENTS, ANNOUNCEMENTS, RELEVANT NOTICES, URGENT ADVISORIES, IS KEPT AT THE BLOG's PAGE. TO ENTER BLOG's PAGE  CLICK  LINK  or    www.sanpedrolodge292.net/blog

30 dec 09 @ 9:15 pm cst 

2009.12.01

Link to web log's RSS file

19th PUBLIC LODGE INSTALLATION
LODGE-OFFICERS-TURNOVERweb.jpg
Top WM Vic G.Guce 2008/9. Bottom WM A.S.Lubag Jr. 2009/10

1.Q) WHO CAN BECOME A MASON (FREEMASON)?

2.Q) HOW WILL I KNOW IF I AM QUALIFIED TO BECOME A MASON ?

3.Q) WHERE  OR TO WHOM SHALL I APPLY TO BECOME A MASON ?

4.Q) WHY NOBODY HAS EVER ASKED ME TO BECOME A MASON ?
5.Q) SHALL I WAIT TO BE INVITED OR SHALL I BE THE ONE TO APPLY ?  
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1.A)    THERE ARE THREE BASIC PRECONDITIONS AN APPLICANT HAS TO SATISFY IN ORDER TO QUALIFY AS PETITIONER  FOR MEMBERSHIP TO A MASONIC LODGE:    (*) THE APPLICANT MUST BE A MAN AGED 21 AND ABOVE,  (**)  MUST BELIEVE IN GOD, (***)  MUST BE OF GOOD MORAL CHARACTER AND HAVE NO DEROGATORY RECORDS.
2.A)    IF YOU HAVE ALREADY SATISFIED THE 3 PRECONDITIONS, THE ANSWER TO QUESTION NUMBER 2 SHOULD COME FROM YOURSELF, AFTER READING THE “MASONIC COMPACT” AT THE END OF THIS PAGE.
3.A)    BY THE ANCIENT RULES OF OUR FRATERNITY, MASONS ARE PREVENTED FROM ACTIVELY RECRUITING NEW MEMBERS, INSOFAR AS BECOMING A MASON HAS TO BE A TOTALLY FREE DECISION OF EVERY PERSON WHO ASPIRES TO BECOME A MEMBER.  WHAT WE ARE ALLOWED TO DO IS TO GIVE HINTS SUCH AS THE ONE YOU MIGHT HAVE SEEN ON OUR HATS, “T” SHIRTS, DECALS, CARS OR READING MATERIAL. “ASK ONE TO BE ONE”.  THE MEANING OF THAT IS, IF YOU WANT TO BECOME A MASON, ASK ONE MASON TO HELP YOU TO BECOME (ONE) MASON.  ONCE YOU ASK A MASON WHOM YOU KNOW [AND WHO KNOWS YOU TO BE A  MAN OF INTEGRITY],  TO INTRODUCE YOU TO HIS LODGE, HE WILL DO IT AND EVENTUALLY HE MIGHT BE ONE OF YOUR TWO SPONSORS WITH THE LODGE.  IN THE EVENTUALITY THAT YOU DO NOT KNOW  ANY MASON , YOU SHALL IDENTIFY A LODGE IN THE AREA WHERE YOU RESIDE, OR LIVE, OR WORK OR WHERE YOUR PRINCIPAL BUSINESS IS LOCATED, VISIT THE LODGE ON A “STATED MEETING DAY”, INTRODUCE YOURSELF TO THE MEMBERS OF THE LODGE, YOU WILL BE WELCOME, EVERY LODGE WELCOMES APPLICANTS. HOW WILL YOU LOCATE A MASONIC LODGE IN YOUR AREA ? CLICK THE FOLLOWING LINK AND ENTER A SITE PROVIDED BY THE ""MOST WORSHIPFUL GRAND LODGE OF FREE & ACCEPTED MASONS OF THE PHILIPPINES"" (GLP), APPLY ONLY TO LEGITIMATE LODGES LISTED IN THE GLP SITEwww.grandlodgephils.org.ph/2012/ >    FOLLOW THE INSTRUCTIONS PROVIDED BY THAT SITE, LODGES ARE LISTED BY NAME, NUMBER AND GEOGRAPHICAL LOCATION. MANY MASONIC LODGES ALREADY HAVE WEBSITES LISTING ADDRESS OR MEETING PLACE, MEMBERS AND OFFICERS.    
4.A) & 5.A)    AS WE HAVE STATED ABOVE, THE ANCIENT RULES OF OUR INSTITUTION DO NOT ENCOURAGE ACTIVE RECRUITMENT, THEREFORE YOU SHALL NOT EXPECT TO BE “INVITED” BY MASONS OR BY A LODGE TO JOIN, IT HAS TO BE YOU, OF YOUR OWN FREE WILL AND INITIATIVE, APPROACHING A MASON OR A MASONIC LODGE AND APPLY (PETITION) FOR MEMBERSHIP.       
If you happen to live, work , reside , or were born or have property or business in San Pedro Laguna, Binan, Santa Rosa  or surrounding Towns & Municipalities, (take a look at the map provided by our site and see  our Lodge location) SPL292-TEMPLE-WITH-LOGO_WEB.jpg you shall apply to San Pedro Lodge 292; the address is Juana 6, Silcas Subdivision, Binan, Laguna, Philippines. To find  & view the location map of SanPedroLodge292   CLICK  MAP.    The days best indicated to visit our Lodge, in person, are  the first Saturday of every month, at  1 PM (SPL292 Stated Meeting), or take a look at the Lodge Calendar of Schedules and Events  for the incoming events and activities to be held by the Lodge and come over accordingly .    Once at the Lodge,  ask for the Lodge Secretary, He will inform you about the requirements and procedures.  Talk to our other Petitioners, meet the Members of the Lodge , AND keep in mind that every Lodge welcomes qualified Applicants (Petitioners):  you will be very much welcome at San Pedro Lodge 292.  San Pedro Lodge No.292 holds frequent Masonic Orientation and Masonic Education Meetings, ask for the dates and ATTEND: you will get answers to your questions and SEE How a Masonic Lodge  cares for its Members and for the Community at large.  To have an IDEA of the Lodge Activities you can access the Lodge Monthly Newsletter "THE COMPASSES" at     www.thecompasses.net     
This page contains 2 series of Questions & Answers, you will find there  answers to the "frequently asked questions"about MASONS (& FreeMasonry). 

2) FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT FREEMASONRY 
What’s a Mason?
That’s not a surprising question. Even though Masons (Freemasons) are members of the largest and oldest fraternity in the world, and even though many have a father or grandfather or uncle or other relative who is or was a Mason, many people aren’t quite certain just who Masons are.The answer is simple. A Mason (or Freemason) is a member of a fraternity known as Masonry (or Freemasonry). A fraternity is a group of men (just as a sorority is a group of women) who join together because:
  • There are things they want to do in their Country and the world.
  • They want to develop & enrich their minds
  • They enjoy being together with Brothers they like and respect.
(We’ll look at some of these things later.)
What’s Masonry?
Masonry (or Freemasonry) is the oldest fraternity in the world. No one knows just how old it is because the actual origins have been lost in time. Probably, it arose from the guilds of stonemasons who built the castles and cathedrals of the Middle Ages. Possibly, they were influenced by the Knights Templar, a group of Christian warrior monks formed in 1118 to help protect pilgrims making trips to the Holy Land.In 1717, Masonry created a formal organization in England when the first Grand Lodge was formed. A Grand Lodge is the administrative body in charge of Masonry in some geographical area. In the United States, there is a Grand Lodge in each state. In Canada, there is a Grand Lodge in each province. Local organizations of Masons are called lodges. There are lodges in most towns, and large cities usually have several. There are about 16,000 lodges in the United States, with over 4.5 million Members, ABOUT 400 LODGES IN THE PHILIPPINES, DISTRIBUTED ALL OVER THE ARCHIPELAGO AND IN THE MOST PROGRESSIVE AND DEVELOPED PROVINCES, CITIES AND TOWNS.    FREEMASONRY BEING A PROGRESSIVE MORAL SCIENCE BASED ON TRUTH AND MORALITY,  MASONS ARE  SYNONIMOUS WITH  GODFEARING,  PROGRESSIVE FREEDOM-LOVERS, COMMUNITY ORIENTED  GOOD CITIZENS, PROMOTERS OF EDUCATION FOR ALL AND  DEDICATED TO THE COMMON GOOD.  
If Masonry started in Great Britain, how did it get to America and the Philippines ? 
In a time when travel was by horseback and sailing ship, Masonry spread with amazing speed. By 1731, when Benjamin Franklin joined the fraternity, there were already several lodges in the Colonies, and Masonry spread rapidly as America expanded west. In addition to Franklin, many of the Founding Fathers — men such as George Washington, Paul Revere, Joseph Warren, and John Hancock — were Masons. Masons and Masonry played an important part in the Revolutionary War and an even more important part in the Constitutional Convention and the debates surrounding the ratification of the Bill of Rights. Many of those debates were held in Masonic lodges.
Likewise Philippine Freemasonry flourished  from the early 1800s, producing the noblest heroes and personalities of Philippine history. Eventually the moltitude of Philippine Masonic Lodges formally united in the year 1912, under the MW Grand Lodge of Free & Accepted Masons of the Philippines, which turned 100 years old in 2012.  Many of the prominent Filipinos who dedicated their entire lives to the cause of freedom, and many of those who died  for the freedom of the Fatherland, during the colonial era and during Japanese occupation, were Freemasons. such as the Brains of the Revolution Dr. Jose Rizal,  Marcelo H. del Pilar, Apolinario Mabini - ; The Leader of the KKK or Katipunan  Andres Bonifacio - ;  The First President of the (first) Philippine Republic Emilio Aguinaldo ;  The writer, journalist, and famous orator, founder of “La Solidaridad”  Graciano Lopez Jaena; Generals of Philippine Revolution : Artemio Ricarte, Mariano Alvarez, Santiago Alvarez, Antonio Luna, Pio Del Pilar, Gregorio Del Pilar, Miguel Malvar, Mariano Trias, Vicente Lucban, Martin Delgado, Licerio Geronimo, and patriots  Jose Alejandrino, Juan Luna; Chief Justice Jose Abad Santos (killed by the Japanese army in WWII);  Presidents Manuel L. Quezon, Manuel Roxas, and Jose P. Laurel; to name a few names of the long name list of Philippine Masons who dedicated their entire lives to Philippine independence, freedom, and progress. A historical reality (conveniently ?) ignored by school History textbooks written by presumably improvised and ignorant textbook writers or anti-mason bigots, is that the almost totality of the Filipino who fought for the freedom and independence of the Philippines either with guns in the battlefields,  or spreading the powerful IDEALS of freedom, equality and independence for the Filipino Nation, were Masons (or Freemasons). Also Masons were the  Great Presidents of the Philippines (listed here above).   
Gen. Douglas McArthur, hero of World War II, was made a Mason in the Philippines.
National Hero Dr. Jose Rizal, a dedicated Mason, is  an example of all moral and social Virtues, a multifaceted genius, great writer, Godfearing, a true Philippine Patriot, a  man gifted with  love for knowledge, love for freedom and equality for all : the perfect example of Philippine Freemason for all People and all times. 
What’s a lodge?
The word “lodge” means both a group of Masons meeting in some place and the room or building in which they meet. Masonic buildings are also sometimes called “temples” because much of the symbolism Masonry uses to teach its lessons comes from the building of King Solomon’s Temple in the Holy Land. The term “lodge” itself comes from the structures which the stonemasons built against the sides of the cathedrals during construction. In winter, when building had to stop, they lived in these lodges and worked at carving stone.While there is some variation in detail from state to state and country to country, lodge rooms today are set up in similar way all over the world. If you’ve ever watched TV coverage of the House of Commons in London, you’ll have a good idea of a Lodge layout. Since Masonry as practiced today in the Philippines arrived from America and in America from England, we still use the English floor plan and English titles for the officers. The Worshipful Master of the Lodge sits in the East (“Worshipful” is an English term of respect which means the same thing as “Honorable.”) He is called the Master of the lodge for the same reason that the leader of an orchestra is called the “Concert Master.” It’s simply an older term for “Leader.” In other organizations, he would be called “President.” The Senior and Junior Wardens are the First and Second Vice-Presidents. Every lodge has an altar holding a “Volume of the Sacred Law.” In the Philippines, USA, UK, and most of the Democratic Nations of the world, that is  always the Holy Bible [King James Version] [Additional Holy books are added for member of other faiths]
Masonry Does Things in the World.Masonry teaches that each person has a responsibility to make things better in the world. Most individuals won’t be the ones to find a cure for cancer, or eliminate poverty, or help create world peace, but every man and woman and child can do something to help others and to make things a little better. Masonry is deeply involved with helping people. With projects large or small, the Masons of a lodge try to help make the world a better place. The lodge gives them a way to combine with others to do even more good.
Masonry does things “inside” the individual Mason.“Grow or die” is a great law of all nature. Most people feel a need for continued growth and development as individuals. They feel they are not as honest or as charitable or as compassionate or as loving or as trusting as they ought to be. Masonry reminds its members over and over again of the importance of these qualities. It lets men associate with other men of honor and integrity who believe that things like honesty and compassion and love and trust are important. In some ways, Masonry is a support group for men who are trying to make the right decisions. It’s easier to practice these virtues when you know that those around you think they are important, too, and won’t laugh at you. That’s a major reason that Masons enjoy being together.
Masons enjoy each other’s company.It’s good to spend time with people you can trust completely, and most Masons find that in their lodge. While much of lodge activity is spent in works of charity or in lessons in self-development, much is also spent in fellowship. Lodges have many events for the whole family. Simply put, a lodge is a place to spend time with friends.For members only, two basic kinds of meetings take place in a lodge. The most common is a simple business meeting. To open and close the meeting, there is a ceremony whose purpose is to remind us of the virtues by which we are supposed to live. Then there is a reading of the minutes; voting on petitions (applications of men who want to join the fraternity); planning for charitable functions, family events, and other lodge activities; and sharing information about members (called “Brothers,” as in most fraternities) who are ill or have some sort of need. The other kind of meeting is one in which people join the fraternity — one at which the “degrees” are performed.But every lodge serves more than its own members. Frequently, there are meetings open to the public. Examples are public installations of officers, Cornerstone Laying ceremonies, and other special meetings supporting community events and dealing with topics of local interest. Masons also sponsor Youth Groups such as the Order of DeMolay for Boys.
What’s a degree?
A degree is a stage or level of membership. It’s also the ceremony by which a man attains that level of membership. There are three, called Entered Apprentice, Fellowcraft, and Master Mason. As you can see, the names are taken from the craft guilds. In the Middle Ages, when a person wanted to join a craft, such as the gold smiths or the carpenters or the stonemasons, he was first apprenticed. As an apprentice, he learned the tools and skills of the trade. When he had proved his skills, he became a “Fellow of the Craft” (today we would say “Journeyman”), and when he had exceptional ability, he was known as a Master of the Craft.The degrees are plays in which the candidate participates. Each degree uses symbols to teach, just as plays did in the Middle Ages and as many theatrical productions do today. (We’ll talk about symbols a little later.)The Masonic degrees teach the great lessons of life — the importance of honor and integrity, of being a person on whom others can rely, of being both trusting and trustworthy, of realizing that you have a spiritual nature as well as a physical or animal nature, of the importance of self-control, of knowing how to love and be loved, of knowing how to keep confidential what others tell you so that they can “open up” without fear.
Why is Masonry so “secretive”?
It really isn’t “secretive,” although it sometimes has that reputation. Masons certainly don’t make a secret of the fact that they are members of the fraternity. We place Masonic Emblems on our cars, We wear rings, lapel pins and tie tacks with Masonic emblems like the Square and Compasses, the best known of Masonic signs which, logically, recalls the fraternity’s roots in stonemasonry. Masonic buildings are clearly marked, and are usually listed in the phone book. Lodge activities are not secret and events are even listed in the newspapers, especially in smaller towns. Many lodges have websites which give the upcoming lodge activities. But there are some Masonic secrets, and they fall into two categories.The first are the ways in which a man can identify himself as a Mason . We keep those private for obvious reasons. It is not at all unknown for unscrupulous people to try to pass themselves off as Masons in order to get assistance under false pretenses.The second group is harder to describe, but they are the ones Masons usually mean if we talk about “Masonic secrets.” They are secrets because they literally can’t be talked about, can’t be put into words. They are the changes that happen to a man when he really accepts responsibility for his own life and, at the same time, truly decides that his real happiness is in helping others.It’s a wonderful feeling, but it’s something you simply can’t explain to another person. That’s why we sometimes say that Masonic secrets cannot ( rather than “may not”) be told. Try telling someone exactly what you feel when you see a beautiful sunset, or when you hear music, like the national anthem, which suddenly stirs old memories, and you’ll understand what we mean.“Secret societies” became very popular in America in the late 1800s and early 1900s. There were literally hundreds of them, and most people belonged to two or three. Many of them were modeled on Masonry, and made a great point of having many “secrets.” And Masonry got ranked with them. But if Masonry is a secret society, it’s the worst-kept secret in town.For an example see the WABC-TV, Channel 7, New York City news report (streaming video RealPlayer required) that aired in May 1994 All grand Lodges and most Lodges have websites that can be read by everybody, and contain a wealth of information about Freemasonry.
Is Masonry a religion?
The answer to that question is simple: NO.   We do use ritual in the meetings, and because there is always an altar or table with the Volume of the Sacred Law open if a lodge is meeting, some people have confused Masonry with a religion, but it is not. That does not mean that religion plays no part in Masonry — it plays a very important part. A person who wants to become a Mason must have a belief in God. No atheist can ever become a Mason. Meetings open and close with prayer, and a Mason is taught, as one of the first lessons of Masonry, that one should pray for divine counsel and guidance before starting an important undertaking. But that does not make Masonry a “religion.”Sometimes people confuse Masonry with a religion because we call some Masonic buildings “temples.” But we use the word in the same sense that Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes called the Supreme Court a “Temple of Justice” and because a Masonic lodge is a symbol of the Temple of Solomon. Neither Masonry nor the Supreme Court is a religion just because its members meet in a “temple.”Masons believe in the importance of religion. Masonry encourages every Mason to be active in the religion and church of his own choice. Masonry teaches that, without religion, a man is alone and lost, and that without religion, he can never reach his full potential.But Freemasonry does not tell a person which religion he should practice or how he should practice it. That is between the individual and God. That is the function of his house of worship, not his fraternity. And Masonry is a fraternity, not a religion.
What is a Masonic Bible?
Bibles are popular gifts among Masons, frequently given to a man when he joins the lodge or at other special events. A Masonic Bible is the same book anyone thinks of as a Bible (it’s usually the King James translation) with a special page in the front on which to write the name of the person who is receiving it and the occasion on which it is given. Sometimes there is a special index or information section which shows the person where in the Bible to find the passages which are quoted in the Masonic ritual.  If Masonry isn’t a religion, why does it use ritual?Many of us may think of religion when we think of ritual, but ritual is used in every aspect of life. It’s so much a part of us that we just don’t notice it. Ritual simply means that some things are done more or less the same way each time.Almost all school assemblies, for example, start with the principal or some other official calling for the attention of the group. Then the group is led in the Pledge of Allegiance. A school choir or the entire group may sing the school song. That’s a ritual.  Almost all business meetings of every sort call the group to order, have a reading of the minutes of the last meeting, deal with old business, then with new business. That’s a ritual. Most groups use Robert’s Rules of Order to conduct a meeting. That’s probably the best-known book of ritual in the world.There are social rituals which tell us how to meet people (we shake hands), how to join a conversation (we wait for a pause, and then speak), how to buy tickets to a concert (we wait in line and don’t push in ahead of those who were there first). There are literally hundreds of examples, and they are all rituals.Masonry uses a ritual because it’s an effective way to teach important ideas — the values we’ve talked about earlier. And it reminds us where we are, just as the ritual of a business meeting reminds people where they are and what they are supposed to be doing.Masonry’s ritual is very rich because it is so old. It has developed over centuries to contain some beautiful language and ideas expressed in symbols. But there’s nothing unusual in using ritual. All of us do it every day.
Why does Masonry use symbols?
Everyone uses symbols every day, just as we do ritual. National Flags are Symbols that as everyone knows, represent Countries, Nations. We use symbolsu because they communicate quickly. When you see a stop sign , you know what it means, even if you can’t read the word “stop.” The circle and line mean “don’t” or “not allowed.” In fact, using symbols is probably the oldest way of communication and the oldest way of teaching.  Masonry uses symbols for the same reason. Some form of the “Square and Compasses” is the most widely used and known symbol of Masonry. In one way, this symbol is a kind of trademark for the fraternity, as the “golden arches” are for McDonald’s. When you see the Square and Compasses on a building, you know that Masons meet there.And like all symbols, they have a meaning.The Square symbolizes things of the earth, and it also symbolizes honor, integrity, truthfulness, and the other ways we should relate to this world and the people in it. The Compasses symbolize things of the spirit, and the importance of a well-developed spiritual life, and also the importance of self-control — of keeping ourselves within bounds. The G stands for Geometry, the science which the ancients believed most revealed the glory of God and His works in the heavens, and it also stands for God, Who must be at the center of all our thoughts and of all our efforts.The meanings of most of the other Masonic symbols are obvious. The gavel teaches the importance of self-control and self-discipline. The hourglass teaches us that time is always passing, and we should not put off important decisions.
So, is Masonry education?
Yes. In a very real sense, education is at the center of Masonry. We have stressed its importance for a very long time. Back in the Middle Ages, schools were held in the lodges of stonemasons. You have to know a lot to build a cathedral — geometry, and structural engineering, and mathematics, just for a start. And that education was not very widely available. All the formal schools and colleges trained people for careers in the church, or in law or medicine. And you had to be a member of the social upper classes to go to those schools. Stonemasons did not come from the aristocracy. And so the lodges had to teach the necessary skills and information. Freemasonry’s dedication to education started there.It has continued. Masons started some of the first public schools in both Europe and America. We supported legislation to make education universal. In the 1800s Masons as a group lobbied for the establishment of state supported education and  land grant colleges. Today we give millions in scholarships each year. We encourage our members to give volunteer time to their local schools, buy classroom supplies for teachers, help with literacy programs, and do everything they can to help assure that each person, adult or child, has the best educational opportunities possible.And Masonry supports continuing education and intellectual growth for its members, insisting that learning more about many things is important for anyone who wants to keep mentally alert and young.
What does Masonry teach?
Masonry teaches some important principles. There’s nothing very surprising in the list. Masonry teaches that:Since God is the Creator, all men and women are the children of God. Because of that, all men and women are brothers and sisters, entitled to dignity, respect for their opinions, and consideration of their feelings.Each person must take responsibility for his/her own life and actions. Neither wealth nor poverty, education nor ignorance, health nor sickness excuses any person from doing the best he or she can do or being the best person possible under the circumstances.No one has the right to tell another person what he or she must think or believe. Each man and woman has an absolute right to intellectual, spiritual, economic, and political freedom. This is a right given by God, not by man. All tyranny, in every form, is illegitimate.Each person must learn and practice self-control. Each person must make sure his spiritual nature triumphs over his animal nature. Another way to say the same thing is that even when we are tempted to anger, we must not be violent. Even when we are tempted to selfishness, we must be charitable. Even when we want to “write someone off,” we must remember that he or she is a human and entitled to our respect. Even when we want to give up, we must go on. Even when we are hated, we must return love, or, at a minimum, we must not hate back. It isn’t easy!Faith must be in the center of our lives. We find that faith in our houses of worship, not in Freemasonry, but Masonry constantly teaches that a person’s faith, whatever it may be, is central to a good life.Each person has a responsibly to be a good citizen, obeying the law. That doesn’t mean we can’t try to change things, but change must take place in legal ways.It is important to work to make this world better for all who live in it. Masonry teaches the importance of doing good, not because it assures a person’s entrance into heaven — that’s a question for a religion, not a fraternity — but because we have a duty to all other men and women to make their lives as fulfilling as they can be.Honor and integrity are essential to life. Life, without honor and integrity, is without meaning.
What are the requirements for membership?
The person who wants to join Masonry must be a man (it’s a fraternity), sound in body and mind, who believes in God, is at least 21 years old, and has a good reputation. (Incidentally, the “sound in body” requirement — which comes from the stonemasons of the Middle Ages — doesn’t mean that a physically challenged man cannot be a Mason; many are).Those are the only “formal” requirements. But there are others, not so formal. He should believe in helping others. He should believe there is more to life than pleasure and money. He should be willing to respect the opinions of others. And he should want to grow and develop as a human being.
How does a man become a Mason?
Some men are surprised that no one has ever asked them to become a Mason. They may even feel that the Masons in their town don’t think they are “good enough” to join. But it doesn’t work that way. For hundreds of years, Masons have been forbidden to ask others to join the fraternity. We can talk to friends about Masonry, we can tell them about what Masonry does. We can tell them why we enjoy it. But we can’t ask, much less pressure anyone to join.There’s a good reason for that. It isn’t that we’re trying to be exclusive. But becoming a Mason is a very serious thing. Joining Masonry is making a permanent life commitment to live in certain ways. We’ve listed most of them above — to live with honor and integrity, to be willing to share and care about others, to trust each other, and to place ultimate trust in God. No one should be “talked into” making such a decision.So, when a man decides he wants to be a Mason, he asks a Mason for a petition or application. He fills it out and gives it to the Mason, and that Mason takes it to the local lodge. The Master of the lodge will appoint a committee to visit with the man and his family, find out a little about him and why he wants to be a Mason, tell him and his family about Masonry, and answer their questions. The committee reports to the lodge, and the lodge votes on the petition. If the vote is affirmative — and it usually is — the lodge will contact the man to set the date for the Entered Apprentice Degree. When the person has completed all three degrees, he is a Master Mason and a full member of the fraternity.
So, what’s a Mason?
A Mason is a man who has decided that he likes to feel good about himself and others. He cares about the future as well as the past, and does what he can, both alone and with others, to make the future good for everyone.Many men over many generations have answered the question, “What is a Mason?” One of the most eloquent was written by the Reverend Joseph Fort Newton, an internationally honored minister of the first half of the 20th Century.
When is a man a Mason?
When he can look out over the rivers, the hills, and the far horizon with a profound sense of his own littleness in the vast scheme of things, and yet have faith, hope, and courage which is the root of every virtue.When he knows that down in his heart every man is as noble, as vile, as divine, as diabolic, and as lonely as himself, and seeks to know, to forgive, and to love his fellow man.When he knows how to sympathize with men in their sorrows, yea, even in their sins knowing that each man fights a hard fight against many odds.When he has learned how to make friends and to keep them, and above all how to keep friends with himself When he loves flowers, can hunt birds without a gun, and feels the thrill of an old forgotten joy when he hears the laugh of a little child.When he can be happy and high-minded amid the meaner drudgeries of life.When star-crowned trees and the glint of sunlight on flowing waters, subdue him like the thought of one much loved and long dead.When no voice of distress reaches his ears in vain, and no hand seeks his aid without response.When he finds good in every faith that helps any man to lay hold of divine things and sees majestic meanings in life, whatever the name of that faith may be.When he can look into a wayside puddle and see something beyond mud, and into the face of the most forlorn fellow mortal and see something beyond sin.When he knows how to pray, how to love, how to hope.When he has kept faith with himself with his fellow man, and with his God; in his hand a sword for evil, in his heart a bit of a song — glad to live, but not afraid to die!Such a man has found the only real secret of Masonry, and the one which it is trying to give to all the world.[Merits: GL  F&AM of NY website]















3) MORE  ANSWERS TO  
1) Q: Where can I get more information about the Freemasons?                                     
    A:  The best way to get information is to ask a Mason. Here below we have collated information made available over the internet by various Grand Lodges of Free & Accepted Masons, answering some of the most common questions about Freemasonry. Should you want more historical information, or more complete informations, we have provided useful links in this website. Moreover,  SAN PEDRO LODGE 292 (our Lodge) is planning to provide at the Center, for the Brethren and Petitioners' reading, some books and electronic information about FreeMasonry.  In local bookstores several books can be found, among others Mark Tabbert's book, American Freemasons,  the easy to read, and yet accurate, Freemasons for Dummies by Christopher Hodapp. and The Complete Idiot's Guide to Freemasonry by S. Brent Morris .
More books of Masonic content are available in local bookstores, and please bear in mind that if you really  desire a  book about FreeMasonry that you do not find on the shelves, you should ask the bookstore to order it and usually they will do it
    A: Part of the mystique of Freemasonry can be attributed to speculation about its roots. Despite many theories, researchers have been unable to conclusively determine exactly when, where, how, and why Freemasonry originated.   The order is thought to have arisen from the European, English and Scottish guilds of practicing stonemasons and cathedral builders in the Middle Ages, but certain Masonic documents actually trace the sciences of geometry and masonry to the time of ancient Egypt, and some historians say that Masonry has its real roots in antiquity, even before great civilizations arose.
The formation of the first Grand Lodge in London in 1717 marks the beginning of the Modern (or "Speculative") era of Freemasonry, when membership was no longer limited to actual working stonemasons. These "Accepted" Masons eventually adopted more enlightened philosophies, and turned what was a tradesmen's organization into a fraternity for moral edification, intellectual recitation, benevolent service, and gentlemanly socialization.


FOR MORE INFO CLICK THE LINK    www.grandlodgephils.org.ph/2012/ 
    A:  Over the last  centuries, Freemasonry seems to have flourished during times of great enlightenment and change. It is no coincidence that Freemasonry rose to prominence during the Age of Enlightenment both in Europe and America - where the new generation believed it could develop methods to foster personal improvement, bring order to society, and understand the whole universe. This sentiment is perhaps even stronger today than it was in the 18th century.  
Today, men seek out Masonry for the same reasons - to better themselves and improve society in the company of like-minded Brothers. As we learn more about how our physical world works, there's also heightened interest in intangible things we don't yet fully understand
- especially topics based upon tradition or having a more mystical nature.     Also, books like The Da Vinci Code and movies like "National Treasure" have inspired both new interest and renewed speculation about the nature of the Fraternity. Though these books and movies are a product more of a vivid imagination than historical fact, the real history of Masonry is perhaps the best story of all, one learned only by asking - and becoming - a Freemason.

To request membership information, please approach the Masonic Lodge nearest to you on a Stated Meeting Day.SAN PEDRO LODGE 292 MEETS ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF EACH MONTH at 1PM. 
    A:  No organization can guarantee to make anyone better, but the timeless values and important truths that are taught as part of the Masonic tradition have proven to inspire, challenge, and develop moral, social and leadership qualities in men. The best known Philippine Mason, National Hero Dr. Jose Rizal, or the best known American Mason, George Washington, both personify the application of the Fraternity's character-building principles in one's life.   Perhaps one of the things that has kept Masonry a strong and vital organization for so long is the fact that the Fraternity proposed only to "make good men better," not to make bad men good. This distinction is critical in that from its earliest days the Craft wisely refrained from involving itself in rehabilitation programs, which more appropriately have remained the purview of both religion and the criminal justice system.  Today, good men from every walk of life are striving to improve themselves in Masonic Lodges the world over. If you would like to become part of this honorable tradition, we welcome your interest.

membership information, please click here.     www.grandlodgephils.org.ph/2012/
    A:  Ask! Because Masons have not traditionally recruited members and do not hold public meetings, there has long been confusion about how to join the Fraternity. Should I wait to be asked? Does someone ask me, or do I need to ask them?Today, because of widespread interest in the Fraternity - along with the breadth of both information and misinformation found on the Internet - the content on this site was assembled to help men understand the membership process.
Most men still begin the process of becoming a Mason by simply asking-just as
Jose Rizal, Marcelo H. Del Pilar, Emilio Aguinaldo, Jose Abas Santos, Manuel L. Quezon, Manuel Roxas, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Hancock, Revere, Giuseppe Garibaldi, Mazzini and most every Mason from the past to the present day has done.   Membership is open to men of every race, religion, culture, and income level.    The basic requirements for membership are listed here.     Men usually seek out a Lodge near their home or workplace or ask a Mason they know to recommend a Lodge to them. Masonry is not for everyone, however. It does not purport to reform bad men, only to provide a lifelong opportunity for good men to improve themselves and the world around them.       The Masonic Fraternity seeks only men of good character as members. In fact, Masonic Lodges are required to review every applicant's moral and social character, and members must be unanimously balloted upon in a Lodge by all members present (and yes, the centuries-old "blackball" voting system is still in use).         Alternately, a  Mason can inform a good man that he knows that should he wish to join, he is welcome to do so under a program called Invitation to Petition.    
Or you may proactively seek out membership on your own by asking a Mason for guidance. You can ask information  or directions by the links provided in this website, write the Lodge Secretary an E-Mail (look below for the link) or, even better, visit the Lodge in your area of residence in the days indicated as Stated Meetings. The choice is still yours.

10) Q: What is a Grand Lodge?        www.grandlodgephils.org.ph/2012/                                               
12) Q; Can Men of any race and creed become Masons?                    
       A:  Masonry accepts men from every race, color, creed, nationality, and culture,  
      A:  Many of the prominent Filipinos who dedicated their entire lives to the cause of the motherland, and many of those who died for the freedom of the Fatherland, during the colonial era and during Japanese occupation, were Freemasons. They are Dr. Jose Rizal - our National Hero, Marcelo H. del Pilar,  Apolinario Mabini - the Brains of the Revolution, Andres Bonifacio - The Leader of the KKK, Emilio Aguinaldo the First President of the first Philippine Republic, the writer, journalist,and famous orator, founder of “La Solidaridad”  Graciano Lopez Jaena,  Jose Alejandrino, Antonio and Juan Luna; Chief Justice Jose Abad Santos,  Presidents Manuel L. Quezon, Manuel Roxas, and Jose P. Laurel, to name a few.      Gen. Douglas McArthur, hero of World War II, was made a Mason in the Philippines. 

     A :  Not in the traditional sense. Masonic principles do however teach the value of relief or charity, and  Freemasons donate thousands of hours of volunteer time and money for worthy causes.   There are numerous  worthy causes and groups that local Lodges contribute to and support in their communities, either independently or in conjunction with the M.W. Grand Lodge of Free & Accepted Masons of the Philippines.     www.grandlodgephils.org.ph/2012/

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                                         MASONIC COMPACT

Because I am a Freemason
...... I believe that freedom of religion is an inalienable human right and tolerance an indispensable trait of human character; therefore, I will stand in my Lodge with Brothers of all faiths, and respect their beliefs as they respect mine, and I will demonstrate the spirit of Brotherhood in all aspects of my life.
... I know that education and the rational use of the mind are the keys to facing the problems of humanity; therefore, I will bring my questions and my ideas to my Lodge, and strive to advance the growth of my mind alongside my Brothers.
... I know that the rich tradition of Freemasonry and its framework of Ritual are important platforms for growth and learning; therefore, I vow to stand upon these platforms to improve myself as a human being, and I vow to help in the mission of the Craft to provide tools, atmosphere, challenges and motivation to help each Brother do the same.
... I know that charity is the distinguishing human virtue, and that personal community service is the best demonstration of a Mason’s commitment to humanity; I acknowledge that words without deeds are meaningless, and I vow to work with my Lodge to provide service to the community, and to promote charity, friendship, morality, harmony, integrity, fidelity and love.
... I know that my obligation to community extends beyond my local sphere and is partly fulfilled in my patriotism: love of my country, obedience to its laws and celebration of the freedoms and opportunities it symbolizes.
... I know that leadership is best demonstrated by commitment to serving others; I will therefore participate in, and help work at improving individual leadership skills, and serve the Brothers of my Lodge to the best of my ability.
... I know that friendship, fidelity and family are the foundations of a well-lived life; I therefore vow to be a faithful friend to my Brothers, as I expect my Lodge to respect my personal obligations, and to treat my family as though my family were their own.
... I know that the last great lesson of Freemasonry -- the value of personal integrity and the sanctity of a Mason’s word of honor-- is a lesson for all people in all times; I therefore vow to be a man of my word.
... I know that Masonry’s power is best exercised when its Light is shared with the world at large; I therefore vow to bring the best of myself to my Lodge, in order that my growth might be fostered and nurtured, and to present myself to the world as a working Freemason, on the path to building a more perfect temple.
Because I am a Freemason, these values and aspirations are the guiding lights for my progress through life.
........................................................................................................ 
[Merits: Compact quoted from w.s. of the Grand Lodge of F&AM of New York

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SAN PEDRO LODGE 292

FOR INFORMATION CLICK THIS LINK AND

PLEASE CONSULT THE LODGE SECRETARY's PAGE or write

E-mail Contact:

spl292secretary@yahoo.com

 

THE HISTORY OF SAN PEDRO LODGE 292, LAGUNA, PHILIPPINES

THE BUILDING OF SAN PEDRO LODGE 292 NEW TEMPLE,

THE DEDICATION OF THE NEW TEMPLE BY MW GM AVELINO I. RAZON, JR.

 

                      THE BRIEF HISTORY OF THE ORIGINS OF SAN PEDRO LODGE NO. 292
                     By VW Perfecto L. Alibadabad, DGL (+)   
The attempt to establish a Lodge at San Pedro, Laguna, was broached about as early as 1983.  This was sooner shelved temporarily due to the preoccupation of the brethren in their respective vocations.  It was not until the middle of 1987 that a serious effort was made by enterprising brethren who were joined by Grand line officers assigning a working Secretary to pursue the labors.  But as circumstances would have it, true, a Lodge was finally organized but without the vicinity of San Pedro which is now the existing Pagkakaisa Lodge No.282 at Las Piñas, Metro Manila. 
Undaunted by the unfortunate twist of events and left to fend for themselves, the San Pedro resident-brethren gathered the pieces and persevered vowing among others, that they themselves should initiate and pursue the Lodge organization until its final fruition.  Meanwhile the growing number of brethren resettled in the sprawling villages and subdivisions near San Pedro and the adjoining towns bordering Laguna, Rizal and Cavite became the more intense in their desire to form a Lodge of their own at the Manila south gate that leads to the Southern Luzon province. San Pedro and Biñan towns are fast developing economically and are growing in population with the migration from the Metro to settle in the numerous housing communities.  With its growth are the relocated brother Masons whose fraternal instinct is to seek the nearest Masonic Lodge temple.  Finding none, they took it upon themselves to contract by word of mouth newly resettled brethren in the area and informally convened in warm fellowships brainstorming the feasibility of pursuing the original dream of organizing a Lodge to shepherd the scattered Masonic flock from far and wide.  Thus was the new beginning of an earnest endeavor to band themselves together like the brethren and fellows before them.  Most spirited and conscientious among those precocious brethren was WB Alex Duque, who was in the last months of his incumbency as Master of St. John Corregidor Lodge No. 3.  He was ably assisted by Bros . Fred Martinez, Ike Crizaldo, Peping Olivarez, Francis Cocha, Rene Sinoy, Oca Panganiban, Pol Cementina, Primo Rivera, Boy Aseoche, Nonoy Arayon, Sammy Garibay, to mention a few among the over 50 Masons confirmed to be residents of villages in the neighborhood.  On hand also were WBs. Enteng Salazar, Jr., then incumbent Master of Laong-Laan Lodge No. 185, Bert Escultura, PM of Bulusan Catanduanes No. 291, and Pike Alabadbad, PM of Indang No. 115 and Palawan No. 99 whose experiences as Master and Past Masters, respectively, were relevant and useful to the grand plan.  The unrelenting diligence and burning passion of WB Alex militated the cooperation and support of the brethren whom he fetched from their homes everytime there was a meeting.  Fellowships were regularly held monthly either at the Naty’s Restaurant of Bro. Peping Olivarez or alternatively in the homes of brethren who volunteered as host.  The fruit of their labors paid off and was consummated with the submission of a Petition of 44 brethren to organize San Pedro Lodge to the MW Grand Lodge on December 3, 1991. MW Grand Master John L. Choa grated the Dispensation on January 28, 1991, to the petitioners to initiate, pass and raise Masons of all good men and true.  Clothed with this authority, the brethren labored enthusiastically and held its first stated meeting on February 16, 1991, under a special dispensation from VW Rodolfo Soriano, DDGM of District No. 11, in lieu of February 2, the first Saturday, having received the Letters of Dispensation after such date.  However short the dispensation period was until its surrender on April 1, 1991, the Lodge U.D. was able to initiate and pass three petitioners who would finally be raised and be credited as the first true sons of the Lodge. The recommendation to grant a Charter to San Pedro Lodge U.D. was strongly endorsed by MW Rudyardo V.  Bunda, PGM, Chairman of the Committee on Charters and By-laws which was thus confirmed in the Annual Grand Communication on April 26, 1991, at Bacolod City. On the strength of such approval, the brethren without let-up endeavored with more vigor their labor and degree work without sacrificing careful and strict selection of its candidates, until the raising on May 25, 1991, of its first three Master Masons namely: Bros. Orlando R. Ortua, Arcadio L. Seron and Beato, Jr. The formal Lodge Constitution was presided over by MW Grand Master Jose Reyes Guerrero on the auspicious Rizal Day celebration on June 19, 1991, after a solemn floral offering ceremonies at the Rizal monument at the town plaza participated in by the Grand Lodge led by MW Guerrero and Grand line officers ; Hon. Calixto Cataquiz, town Mayor and the Sangguniang Bayan members; Fr. Pol Mendoza, officiating Priest and brethren of Masonic District No. 11.  In the constitution ceremonies, the MW Grand Master was assisted by RW Agustin Mateo, Deputy Grand Master, VW Fernando Pascua, Jr., Senior Grand Lecturer and other Grand line officers and Past Masters in the District.  The whole-day celebration was culminated with the first public Installation of Officers by VW Rodolfo R. Soriano, DDGM as Installing Officer and WB Calvin Estudillo, PM as Master of Ceremonies.  Installed as charter officers of the Lodge were : Perfecto L. Alibadbad, PM, Master; Wilfred B. Martinez, SW; Primo V. Rivera, JW; Vicente D. Salazar, Jr., PM, Treasurer; Enrique N. Crizaldo, Sec.; Felizardo P. Tirado, Chp.; Leopoldo R. Cementina, SD; Michael V. Casipit, JD; Oscar L. Panganiban, Mrl; Renato B. Sinoy. Aud; Eufracio R. Manarin, PM, Orator; Alexander Duque, PM, Lect; Beato R. Relate, Jr., Bible Bearer; Avelino M. Matundan, SS; Andres L. Rebuelta, JS; J. Ludwig Aseoche, Org; Arcadio L. Seron,  Master of Banquet; Orlando R. Ortua, Aim; and Alejandro R. Calleda, Tyler. [PLA]

SPL292 RECENT HISTORY, THE BUILDING OF THE NEW TEMPLE.

SPL292 FROM DISPENSATION TO  CONSTITUTION  AND  RECENT HISTORY, 

FROM 1991, YEAR OF ITS CONSTITUTION TO 2008 THE LODGE MOVED FROM FROM PLACE TO PLACE, NOT HAVING ACQUIRED, AS YET, ITS OWN LAND WHERE TO BUILD A PERMANENT CONCRETE BUILDING (MASONIC TEMPLE).      

EVENTUALLY IT WAS ONLY IN THE YEAR 2008, DURING THE INCUMBENCY AND BY DECISION OF WORSHIPFUL MASTER VICENTE G. GUCE, THAT SAN PEDRO (MASONIC) LODGE  292  ACQUIRED THE LAND FOR  AND STARTED THE CONSTRUCTION OF ITS OWN MASONIC CENTER (TEMPLE) AT SILCAS SUBDIVISION, BINAN, LAGUNA (PHILIPPINES). UNDER THE WATCHFUL AND EXPERT EYES OF SAN PEDRO LODGE 292 MASONS, AND THE FINANCIAL CONTRIBUTION OF MEMBERS, GENEROUS DONORS, AND CONTRIBUTORS,  THE BUILDING CONSTRUCTION PROCEEDED EXPEDITIOUSLY, SO MUCH THAT IT WAS MADE POSSIBLE TO HOLD  THE 19th PUBLIC INSTALLATION OF OFFICERS ON MARCH 7, 2009  IN THE NEWLY CONSTRUTED TEMPLE. THE CEREMONY WAS ATTENDED BY A VERY LARGE    NUMBER OF MASONS FROM MANY  MASONIC   LODGES,  BY REPRESENTATIVES OF THE MOST WORSHIPFUL GRAND LODGE OF FREE & ACCEPTED MASONS OF THE PHILIPPINES,    BY THE MASONIC DISTRICT IV-B OFFICERS, BY FOREIGN DIGNITARIES, BY PETITIONERS AND VISITORS. [SEE PICTURES IN SPL292 BLOG]       THE  NEW CENTER, IS A SPACIOUS TWO STOREY BUILDING, WITH CLASSIC MASONIC LODGE LAYOUT.  LOCATED IN    AN ENVIRONMENT FRIENDLY  SUBDIVISION. SPL292 IS ACCESSIBLE THROUGH NATIONAL AND PROVINCIAL HIGHWAYS, AND FROM THE SOUTH        LUZON EXPRESSWAY   [SLEX]  SOUTHWOODS EXIT. THE DESIGN OF SPL292 CENTER ( TEMPLE )  BUILDING [by ARCHITECT AVELINO S. LUBAG, JR., WM 2009/2010] HAS TAKEN IN DUE CONSIDERATION THE NEED TO ACCOMODATE THE MEETINGS, CEREMONIES, DEGREE WORKS AND THE FELLOWSHIP OF A GROWING NUMBER OF ATTENDING  BRETHRENTHE MASONIC LECTURES AND THE MASONIC EDUCATION OF PETITIONERS. THE LODGE HAVING EVENTUALLY BUILT ITS OWN PERMANENT BUILDING WITH EXCELLENT STANDARDS AS FAR AS FACILITIES FOR MASONIC ACTIVITIES ARE CONCERNED, HAS ATTRACTED ATTENTION, GENERATING LOT OF INTEREST WITHIN THE COMMUNITY WITH NEW PETITIONERS SIGNIFYING THEIR INTEREST AT EVERY STATED MEETING DATE, AND HAS MOTIVATED A RENEWED INTEREST IN ORGANIZING FREQUENT MEETINGS, SO MUCH THAT THERE ARE SAN PEDRO BRETHREN GATHERING AT SPL292 DAILY AND LIKEWISE  ARE FREQUENT AT THE LODGE VISITORS, PETITIONERS AND BRETHREN FROM OTHER LODGES. THESE FREQUENT MASONIC GATHERINGS ARE EVER INTELLECTUALLY STIMULATING AND THE FELLOWSHIP  LIVELY, ENJOYABLE AND HARMONIOUSLY CONDUCTED.  SAN PEDRO LODGE 292 IS SPONSORING THE "SAN PEDRO DEMOLAY" WHO HAVE REGULAR MEETING AT THE TEMPLE ON THE AFTERNOON OF EVERY 2ND AND 4TH SUNDAY OF EACH MONTH.         

THE NEW TEMPLE. 

STARTED DURING THE TERM OF WM VICENTE G. GUCE, THE TEMPLE WAS COMPLETED DURING THE TERM OF VW AVELINO S. LUBAG, JR. AS OF MARCH 2010, IN OCCASION OF THE 20TH PUBLIC INSTALLATION OF OFFICERS, EXTERIOR FINISHING OF THE BUILDING WAS COMPLETED IN FULL RESPECT  OF SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVED DESIGN. FOR THE INTERIOR FINISHING WORKS, A GRANITE BAR CORNER WAS BUILT, OPPOSITE TO THE GRANITE FOOD COUNTER  AND  WAS DESIGNED TO BECOME ONE OF THE FOCAL POINTS DURING FELLOWSHIP. REPAINTING OF INTERIOR WALLS AND CEILINGS STAINED OR DAMAGED  BY RAINWATER DURING THE DESTRUCTIVE TYPHOONS OF 2009,  HAS BEEN COMPLETED, (A COMPLETE WATERPROOFING OF THE EXTERIOR WALLS AND CHECK UP OF ROOF WERE ALSO COMPLETED AT THE END OF 2009). STEEL LOUVERS WERE INSTALLED ON BOTH SIDE OF THE BUILDING  TO FACILITATE VENTILATION OF THE KICTCHEN AREA AND REST ROOMS AREA. THERE IS A PLAN FOR THE NEAR FUTURE TO  INSTALL FIX BENCHES AT THE SOUTH AND NORTH SIDES OF THE FUNCTION HALL, AND TO INCREASE THE NUMBER OF  AIRCONDITIONING UNITS, A NECESSITY ALREADY, DUE TO THE VERY SUBSTANTIAL INCREASE IN NUMBER OF ATTENDING BRETHREN.

THE NEW TEMPLE'S  DEDICATION.

THE DECISION TO REQUEST  THE MW GRAND LODGE OF F&AM OF THE PHILIPPINES TO DEDICATE THE NEW TEMPLE OF SAN PEDRO LODGE 292, WAS TAKEN BY THE BRETHREN OF SPL292 DURING THE STATED MEETING OF JUNE 5, 2010. IN THE SAME MEETING THE LODGE RECEIVED THE FROM THE BRETHREN THE COMMITMENT FOR THE CONTRIBUTIONS NECESSARY TO COVER FOR THE BUDGET OF THE EVENT: ABOUT 250 GUESTS WERE EXPECTED TO ATTENDON THE SAME DAY  WM  AMBROSIO D. RESTRIVERA DECIDE TO PROPOSE JULY 31 AS THE DATE OF  THE NEW TEMPLE DEDICATION.  A LETTER WAS DRAFTED, ADDRESSED TO THE MW GRAND MASTER THROUGH THE MW GRAND SECRETARY  DANILO D. ANGELES (PGM), INVITING THE MW GRAND MASTER TO DEDICATE THE NEW TEMPLE ON JULY 31, 2010.   THE INVITATION LETTER  WAS PRESENTED BY SPL292 JUNIOR WARDEN TO THE MW DANILO D. ANGELES, GRAND SECRETARY, ON THURSDAY JUNE 10, AT THE GRAND LODGE.    ON JUNE 19, 2019 IN OCCASION OF NATIONAL HERO DR. JOSE P. RIZAL, PHILIPPINE MOST FAMOUS MASON,  149TH BIRTHDAY ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION, HELD AT THE RIZAL SHRINE IN CALAMBA CITY  BY MASONS FROM ALL OVER THE PHILIPPINES, THE MW GM AVELINO I. RAZON,JR., PERSONALLY   CONFIRMED THE DATE OF THE NEW TEMPLE DEDICATION ON JULY 31, 2010 AT 3PM.  

ON JULY 31st 2010, A SATURDAY, THE NEW TEMPLE OF SAN PEDRO LODGE 292 WAS DEDICATED BY THE MOST WORSHIPFUL GRAND MASTER OF THE FREE AND ACCEPTED MASONS OF THE PHILIPPINES, MW GM AVELINO I. RAZON, JR., ASSISTED BY RW DEPUTY GRAND MASTER JUANITO ABERGAS; GRAND BIBLE BEARER VW WILFREDO CE SING; SENIOR GRAND LECTURER VW ROLANDO F. ROCHA;  JUNIOR GRAND LECTURER ROLANDO B. DARAO;  VW EMMANUEL J. DIESTA; AMONG OTHERS.   THE NEW TEMPLE DEDICATION CEREMONY WAS ATTENDED BY A VERY LARGE CROWD OF MASONS FROM THE DISTRIC OF LAGUNA, FROM THE SURROUNDING DISTRICTS, & FROM MANY FARAWAY LODGES.  THE AWE GENERATED BY THE GREAT BEAUTY AND SOLEMNITY OF THE DEDICATION CEREMONY HAS PERMANENTLY IMPRINTED THE MEMORY OF THIS MAJESTIC  EVENT IN THE MINDS OF THE BRETHREN , OLD AND YOUNG ALIKE.  AFTER THE TEMPLE DEDICATION CEREMONY, THE MW GRAND MASTER AVELINO I. RAZON JR., ASSISTED BY THE RW DEPUTY GRAND MASTER JUANITO ABERGAS PROCEED TO UNVEIL THE LOGO - SEAL OF SAN PEDRO LODGE 292 PLACED IN THE FACADE OF THE NEW TEMPLE, AND TO AWARD  THE PLAQUE OF APPRECIATION  TO PAST MASTER WB VICENTE G. GUCE WHO INITIATED AND SUBSTANTIALLY COMPLETED THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE NEW TEMPLE AND TO PM WB AVELINO S. LUBAG JR., WHO DESIGNED THE STRUCTURE AND DURING WHOSE TENURE AS WM THE TEMPLE'S FINISHING WORKS AND THE MODIFIED TEMPLE FACADE WERE  COMPLETED.     THE CELEBRATIONS AND FELLOWSHIP WHICH FOLLOWED THE DEDICATION AND LASTED UNTIL EARLY MORNING, ARE  ALSO SOMETHING THAT WILL BE REMEMBERED FOR QUITE A WHILE.  

    

SAN PEDRO LODGE 292 SEAL, THE ORIGINAL DESIGN AND ITS EVOLUTION TO THE PRESENT FORM.

  Our Seal or Logo has evolved from the original replica of two sampaguita branches in open and in circular form to the symbolic laurel-leaf or olive branch design which is more proportionate and less cumbersome to the eye. While the original sampaguita was then deemed appropriate being indigenous to the town of San Pedro, having been known as the City of Sampaguita, the laurel wreath is equally emblematic and edifying of the noble tenets of Freemasonry.  The laurel wreath denotes honor, victory and distinction or the olive branch has since then signified peace.  All of such symbolisms are descriptive of the teachings of our Venerable Institution and which qualities are expected of every member of the Lodge in particular, and of all Masons, in general.  In each of the branch are 22 leaves for a total of 44, representing the 44 brother Master Masons who signed as petitioners for a Lodge Charter.  The six flower buds at the extremities denote the six principal jewels of a Lodge and more particularly, in our case, the first set of Lodge officers elected by the brethren by consensus to lead the labors to fruition, of their ardent desire to finally consummate the founding of a Lodge in lieu of previous efforts that saw its chartering in some other place. The branches are circular in presentation subtly projecting a circle-symbol of divinity and infinity, no beginning and no end as GOD is, the Alpha and the Omega.  Moreover, the circumference of the representative circle has always been the boundary line of every Mason’s conduct, beyond which he should never suffer his passions, prejudices and personal interests. The Three Great Lights of Masonry, its center-piece, are enclosed in a cabletow forming a triangle.  The equilateral triangle is at once the symbol of the Deity, for which the touchstones of Masonic teachings are anchored.  Moreover, this triangle also signifies that San Pedro Lodge, being at the convergence point of three provinces from which its present membership hail from – Laguna, Rizal and Cavite, and from which subsequently, will be the rich quarries from where the perfect ashlars needed for temple building and perpetuation and flourish of the Craft will be hewn and raised (PLA) 
 


                                                          USEFUL LINKS:

SANPEDRO LODGE 292 WEBSITES

OFFICIAL SEAL
SPLSAMPAGUITALOGOweb5s.jpg
SAN PEDRO LODGE 292, F$AM, PHILIPPINES